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May 13, 2015

A Smashing Cosplay Of Nigel Thornberry

The Wild Thornberrys is an American animated TV series that aired on Nickelodeon. It was a rerun in the United States on Nickelodeon and occasionally Nicktoons until 2007.

The show returned to The ’90s Are All That for one night, and aired on March 21, 2013. The show aired on Nicktoonsters in the UK. Following Shout! Factory acquisition of the title in February 2011, all 5 series have been released on DVD.

The series focuses around a nomadic family of documentary filmmakers known as the Thornberrys, who are famous for their televised wildlife studies.

It primarily centers on the family’s younger daughter Eliza, who has a secret gift to communicate with animals, bestowed upon her after having rescued a shaman masquerading as a trapped wild animal and thus enabling her to talk to the Thornberrys’ adopted pet chimpanzee Darwin.

Together, the pair frequently ventures through the wilderness, befriending endless species of wild animals along the way or making realizations of vital morals through either their experiences or a particular animal species’ lifestyle, or simply assisting the creatures with which they become acquainted in their difficulties.

The Wild Thornberrys was produced by Klasky Csupo for Nickelodeon. It premiered in September 1998, and was the first Nicktoon to exclusively use 22-minute stories (episodes of other Nicktoons usually featured two 10 – 11-minute stories, using 22-minute stories only on occasion).

Quite An Unusual Thing To See While Whale Watching

Whale is commonly used for various marine mammals of the order Cetacea. The term whale sometimes refers to all cetaceans, but more often it excludes dolphins and porpoises, which belong to the suborder Odontoceti (toothed whales).

This suborder includes the sperm whale, killer whale, pilot whale, and beluga whale.

The other Cetacean suborder, Mysticeti (baleen whales), comprises filter feeders that eat small organisms caught by straining seawater through a comb like structure found in the mouth called baleen.

This suborder includes the blue whale, the humpback whale, the bowhead whale and the minke whale. All cetaceans have forelimbs modified as fins, a tail with horizontal flukes, and nasal openings (known as blowholes) on top of the head.

Whales range in many different sizes from the blue whale, the largest animal known to have ever existed at 30 m and 180 tons, to pygmy species such as the pygmy sperm whale at 3.5 m.

Whales inhabit all the world’s oceans and number in the millions, with annual population growth rate estimates for various species ranging from 3% to 13%.

Whales are long-lived, humpback whales living for up to 77 years, while bowhead whales may live for over a century.

Train Wreck Of A Train That Carried Airplane Parts

A train wreck or train crash is a disaster that can involving one or more trains. The most common result of a train wreck is miscommunication, as when a moving train meets another train on the same track; or an accident, such as when a train wheel jumps off a track in a derailment; or when a boiler explosion occurs.

Train wrecks have often been widely covered in popular media and in folklore.

Because train wrecks usually cause huge property damage as well as injury or death, the intentional wrecking of a train in regular service is often treated as an extremely serious crime.

An example of this, in the U.S. state of California, the penalty for intentionally causing a non-fatal train wreck is life imprisonment with the possibility of parole. For a fatal train wreck, the possible sentences are either life imprisonment without the possibility of parole, or death.

The unusual harshness of California’s train wrecking statute has been expressly recognized by its appellate courts. The Supreme Court of California explained in 1972 that train wrecking is one of only eight crimes in the California Codes for which a capital sentence is authorized.

The California Court of Appeal pointed out the next year that (at that time) train wrecking was the only other crime besides aggravated kidnapping in the Penal Code for which the Legislature had expressly established the punishment of life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.

This Is What Happens When A Woodpecker Decorates Your House

The woodpeckers, piculets, wrynecks, and sapsuckers are a family, Picidae, of near-passerine birds. Members of this family can be found worldwide, except for Australia, New Guinea, New Zealand, Madagascar, and the extreme Polar Regions.

Most species live in forests or woodland ecosystems, although a few species are known to live in treeless areas, such as rocky hillsides and deserts.

The Picidae are just one of the eight living families in the order Piciformes. Members of the order Piciformes, such as the jacamars, puffbirds, barbets, toucans, and honeyguides, have traditionally been thought to be very closely related to the woodpeckers, piculets, wrynecks, and sapsuckers. More recently, DNA sequence analyses have confirmed this view.

There are about 200 species and about 30 genera in this family. Many species are threatened or endangered due to loss of habitat or habitat fragmentation. Two species of woodpeckers, the Ivory-billed Woodpeckerand the Imperial Woodpecker, have been considered extinct for about 30 years.

The woodpeckers range from highly antisocial solitary species that are aggressive toward other members of their species, to species that live in groups. Group-living species tend to be communal group breeders. In addition to these species, a number of species may join mixed-species feeding flocks with other insectivorous birds, although they tend to stay at the edges of these groups.

Joining these flocks allows woodpeckers to decrease anti-predator vigilance and increase their feeding rate. Woodpeckers are diurnal, roosting at night inside holes. In most species the roost will become the nest during the breeding season.

Losing 6 Million Dollars In Less Than 5 Minutes

Dollar is the name of several currencies, including those of Australia, Belize, Brunei, Canada, Hong Kong, Namibia, New Zealand, Singapore, Taiwan, the United States, and previously Zimbabwe. The U.S. dollar is the official currency of East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Palau, the Caribbean Netherlands, and for banknotes, Panama. Generally, one dollar is divided into one hundred cents.

On 15 January 1520, the kingdom of Bohemia began minting coins from silver mined locally in Joachimsthal. The coins were called “Joachimsthaler,” which became shortened in common usage to thaler or taler. The German name Joachimsthal literally means Joachim’s valley or Joachim’s dale. This name found its way into other languages: Czech tolar, Hungarian tallér,Danish and Norwegian (rigs) daler, Swedish (riks) daler, Icelandic dalur,Dutch (rijks)daalder or daler, Ethiopian ታላሪ (“talari”), Italian tallero, Polishtalar, Persian Dare, as well as – via Dutch – into English as dollar.

A later Dutch coin depicting a lion was called the leeuwendaler or leeuwendaalder, literally ‘lion daler’. The Dutch Republic produced these coins to accommodate its booming international trade. The leeuwendaler circulated throughout the Middle East and was imitated in several German and Italian cities. This coin was also popular in theDutch East Indies and in the Dutch New Netherland Colony (New York).

It was in circulation throughout the Thirteen Colonies during the 17th and early 18th centuries and was popularly known as lion (or lyon) dollar. The modern American-English pronunciation of dollar is still remarkably close to the 17th century Dutch pronunciation of daler. Some well-worn examples circulating in the Colonies were known as “dog dollars”.

Spend A Cozy Night In This Bear Sleeping Bag

A sleeping bag is a protective “bag” for a person to sleep in essentially a sleeping bag is a blanket with a zipper, and functions as a bed in situations where a bed is unavailable. The primary purpose of a sleeping bag is to provide warmth and thermal insulation.

It also protects, to some extent, against wind chill, precipitation, and exposure to view, but a tent performs those functions better. The bottom surface also provides some cushioning, but a sleeping pad is usually used in addition for that purpose. Abivouac sack is a waterproof cover for a sleeping bag that may be used in place of a tent for lightweight travelers or as a backup if inclement weather occurs.

The “Euklisia Rug”, patented by mail-order pioneer Pryce Pryce-Jones in 1876, is considered by many to have been the first forerunner of the modern sleeping bag. Pryce-Jones, a Newtown, Montgomeryshire England entrepreneur developed the bag and exported around the world in the late 19th century.

Documents show that he sold 60,000 of these rugs to the Russian army – and the British army also bought them. There are records of civilian uses too – among missionaries in Africa and pioneers in the Australian outback.

The Difference Between 1977 Hobbit And 2013 Hobbit

Hobbits are a fictional humanoid race, and they are easily recognizable by their height, all of the hobbits are shorter than humans, and by their large feet.

Hobbits first appeared in the novel The Hobbit, in which the main protagonist, Bilbo Baggins, is the titular hobbit. The novel, The Lord of the Rings, includes more Hobbits as major characters, Frodo Baggins, Samwise Gamgee, Peregrin Took and Meriadoc Brandybuck, as well as several other minor hobbit characters. Hobbits are also briefly mentioned in The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales.

According to the author in the prologue to The Lord of the Rings, Hobbits are “relatives” of the race of Men. Elsewhere Tolkien describes Hobbits as a “variety” or separate “branch” of humans. Within the story, Hobbits and other races seem aware of the similarities.

However, within the story, Hobbits considered themselves a separate people. At the time of the events in The Lord of the Rings, Hobbits lived in the Shire and in Bree in the north west of Middle-earth, though by the end, some had moved out to the Tower Hills and to Gondor and Rohan.

This Is One Awesome Tree House

Tree houses also known as tree forts, are platforms or buildings constructed around, next to or among the trunk or branches of one or more mature trees while above ground level. Tree houses can be used for many things and some of them are: recreation, work space, habitation, observation or as temporary retreats.

Tree houses are built usually by people for leisure purposes, also for protection from wild animals. In some parts of the tropics, houses are either fastened to trees or elevated on stilts to keep the living quarters above the ground to protect occupants and stored food from scavenging animals.

The Korowai, a Papuan tribe in the southeast of Irian Jaya, live in tree houses, some nearly 40 m high, as protection against a tribe of neighboring head-hunters, the Citak.

Along with subterranean and ground level houses, tree houses are an option for building eco-friendly houses in remote forest areas, the reason why they are eco-friendly is because they do not require a clearing of a certain area of forest. The wildlife, climate and illumination on ground level in areas of dense close-canopy forest are not desirable to some people.

The tree house has been central to various environmental protest communities around the world, in a technique known as tree sitting. This method may be used in protests against proposed road building or old growth forestry operations. Tree houses are used as a method of defense from which it is difficult and costly to safely evict the protesters and begin work.

Julia Butterfly Hill is a particularly well known tree sitter who occupied a Californian Redwood for 738 days, saving the tree and others in the immediate area. Her accommodation consisted of two 3 m2  platforms 60 m above the ground.

This Is What Happens When Raccoons Spend Some Time In Your House

The raccoon, but it can also be spelled racoon, which is also known as the common raccoon, North American raccoon, and northern raccoon and colloquially as coon, is a medium-sized mammal native to North America.

The raccoon is the largest of the procyonid family, having a body length of 40 to 70 cm and a body weight of 3.5 to 9 kg. Its grayish coat mostly consists of dense underfur which protects the animal from the cold weather.

Two of the raccoon’s most distinctive features are its extremely dexterous front paws and its facial mask, which are themes in the mythology of several Native American tribes.

Raccoons are known for their intelligence, with studies showing that they are able to remember the solution to tasks for up to three years. The diet of the omnivorous raccoon, which is usually nocturnal, consists of about 40% invertebrates, 33% plant foods, and 27% vertebrates.

The original habitats of the raccoon are deciduous and mixed forests, but due to their adaptability they have extended their range to mountainous areas, coastal marshes, and urban areas, where some homeowners consider them to be pests.

As a result of escapes and deliberate introductions in the mid-20th century, raccoons are now also distributed across the European mainland, the Caucasus region and Japan.

Though previously thought to be solitary, there is now evidence that raccoons engage in gender-specific social behavior. Related females often share a common area, while unrelated males live together in groups of up to four animals to maintain their positions against foreign males during the mating season, and other potential invaders.

A Perfect Hidden Library

A library is an organized collection of sources of information and similar resources, made accessible to a defined community for reference or borrowing. It provides physical or digital access to material, and may be a physical building or room, or a virtual space, or sometimes both. A library’s collection can include books, periodicals, newspapers, manuscripts, maps, prints, documents, and in recent time CDs, cassettes, videotapes, DVDs, Blu-ray Discs, e-books, audiobooks, databases, and many other formats. Libraries range in size from only a couple of shelves of books to several million items.

Librarians have sometimes complained that some of the library buildings which have been used to accommodate libraries have been inadequate for the demands made upon them. In general this condition may have resulted from one or more of the following causes:

An effort to erect a monumental building; most of those who commission library buildings are not librarians and their priorities may be different

To conform it to a type of architecture unsuited to library purposes

The appointment, often by competition, of an architect unschooled in the requirements of a library

Failure to consult with the librarian or with library experts

Much advancement has undoubtedly been made toward cooperation between architect and librarian, and many good designers have made library buildings their specialty, nevertheless it seems that the ideal type of library is not yet realized—the type so adapted to its purpose that it would be immediately recognized as such, as is the case with school buildings at the present time. This does not mean that library constructions should conform rigidly to a fixed standard of appearance and arrangement, but it does mean that the exterior should express as nearly as possible the purpose and functions of the interior.

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