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December 13, 2018

Map Of Earth Made Out Of Matches


A match is a tool that is used to start a fire. Usually, modern matches are made of tiny wooden sticks or stiff paper. One end is coated with a material that can be ignited by frictional heat generated by striking the match against a suitable surface.  Wooden matches are packaged in matchboxes, and paper matches are partially cut into rows and stapled into matchbooks.

The coated end of a match, known as the match “head”, contains either phosphorus or phosphorus sesquisulfide as the active ingredient and gelatin as a binder. There are two different types of matches: safety matches, which can be struck only against a specially prepared surface, and strike-anywhere matches, for which any suitably frictional surface can be used. Some match-like compositions, known as electric matches, are ignited electrically and do not make use of heat from friction.


Historically, the term match referred to lengths of cord (later cambric) impregnated with chemicals, and allowed to burn continuously. These were used to light fires and fire guns and cannons. Such matches were characterized by their burning speed i.e. quick match and slow match. Depending on its formulation, a slow match burns at a rate of around 30 cm per hour and a quick match at 4 to 60 cm per minute.

The modern equivalent of this sort of match is the simple fuse, still used in pyrotechnics to obtain a controlled time delay before ignition. The original meaning of the word still persists in some pyrotechnics terms, such as black match (a black-powder-impregnated fuse) and Bengal match (a firework akin to sparklers producing a relatively long-burning, colored flame).

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