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June 18, 2019

Special Armor For Your Cat

Armour, commonly called armor, is a covering that is used to protect an object, individual, or a vehicle from direct contact weapons or projectiles, usually during combat, or from a dangerous environment or action (e.g., cycling, construction sites, etc.).Personal armor is used to protect soldiers and such war animals as war horses (the application for the latter called barding). Vehicle armor is used on warships and armored fighting vehicles.

The word “armour” was introduced into use in the Middle Ages as a borrowing from the French. It is dated from 1297, as a “mail, defensive covering worn in combat” from Old French armoire, itself derived from the Latin armatura “arms and/or equipment” with the root arma “arms or gear”.

Throughout recorded history armor has been made from various materials: from rudimentary leather protection, personal armor evolved to Mail and full plated suits of armor. For much of military history the manufacture of metal personal armor has dominated the technology and employment of armor, which drove the development of many important technologies of the Ancient World, including wood lamination, mining, metal refining, vehicle manufacture, leather processing, and later decorative metal working. Its production influenced the industrial revolution and commercial development of metallurgy and engineering. Armor most influenced the development of firearms, which revolutionized warfare.

Russian Bear Hunting Armor That Will Give You Nightmares

Cuirasses and helmets were manufactured in Japan as early as the 4th century.Tankō, worn by foot soldiers and keikō, worn by horsemen were both pre-samurai types of early Japanese armour constructed from iron plates connected together by leather thongs. Japanese lamellar armour (keiko) passed through Korea and reached Japan around the 5th century. These early Japanese lamellar armours took the form of a sleeveless jacket and a helmet.

Armour did not always cover all of the body; sometimes no more than a helmet and leg plates were worn. The rest of the body was generally protected by means of a large shield. Examples of armies equipping their troops in this fashion were the Aztecs (16th century DC), and the hoplites in Ancient Greece.

In East Asia many types of armour were commonly used at different times by various cultures including, scale armour, lamellar armour, laminar armour, plated mail, mail, plate armour and brigandine. Around the dynastic Tang, Song, and early Ming Period, cuirasses and plates (mingguangjia) were also used, with more elaborate versions for officers in war. The Chinese, during that time used partial plates for “important” body parts instead of covering their whole body since too much plate armour hinders their martial arts movement. The other body parts were covered in cloth, leather, lamellar, and/or Mountain pattern. In pre-Qin dynasty times, leather armour was made out of various animals, with more exotic ones such as the rhinoceros.

Nazgul Armor Made Of Iron

The Nazgûl (from Black Speech nazg, “ring”, and gûl, “wraith, spirit” (presumably related to gul, “sorcery”); also called Ring wraiths, Ring-wraiths, Black Riders, Dark Riders, the Nine Riders, or simply the Nine) are fictional characters in J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium. They were nine Men who succumbed to Sauron’s power and attained near-immortality as wraiths, servants bound to the power of the One Ring. They are first mentioned in The Lord of the Rings, originally published in 1954–1955. The book calls the Nazgûl Sauron’s “most terrible servants”.
The Appendices of The Return of the King explain that the Nazgûl first appeared around S.A. 2251, some 700 years after the rings were forged, and were soon established as Sauron’s principal servants. They were dispersed after the first overthrow of Sauron in 3441 at the hands of the Last Alliance of Elves and Men, but their survival was assured since the One Ring survived.
They re-emerged around T.A. 1300, when the Witch-king led Sauron’s forces against the successor kingdoms of Arnor: Rhudaur, Cardolan and Arthedain. He effectively destroyed all the successor kingdoms, but was defeated in 1975 and returned to Mordor. There he gathered the other Nazgûl in preparation for the return of Sauron to that realm.
In 2000, the Nazgûl besieged Minas Ithil and, after two years, captured it and acquired its palantír for Sauron. The city thereafter became Minas Morgul, the stronghold of the Nazgûl. Sauron returned to Mordor in 2942 and declared himself openly in 2951. Two or three of the Nazgûl were sent to garrison Dol Guldur, his fortress in Mirkwood.







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