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September 15, 2019

This Is How Disney Princesses Would Look On Covers Of Magazines

A cover is any protective covering used to bind together the pages of a book or a magazine. Beyond the familiar distinction between hardcovers and paperbacks, there are further alternatives and additions, such as dust jackets, ring-binding, and older forms such as the nineteenth-century “paper-boards” and the traditional types of hand-binding. This article is concerned with modern mechanically produced covers.

Before the early nineteenth century, books were hand-bound, in the case of luxury medieval manuscripts using materials such as gold, silver and jewels. For hundreds of years, book bindings had functioned as a protective device for the expensively printed or hand-made pages, and as a decorative tribute to their cultural authority. In the 1820s great changes began to occur in how a book might be covered, with the gradual introduction of techniques for mechanical book-binding.

Cloth, and then paper, became the staple materials used when books became so cheap—thanks to the introduction of steam-powered presses and mechanically-produced paper—that to have them hand-bound became disproportionate to the cost of the book itself.

Not only were the new types of book-covers cheaper to produce, they were also printable, using multi-colour lithography, and later, half-tone illustration processes. Techniques borrowed from the nineteenth-century poster-artists gradually infiltrated the book industry, as did the professional practice of graphic design. The book cover became more than just a protection for the pages, taking on the function of advertising, and communicating information about the text inside.

Disney Princess Turned Into Sloths

Sloths are medium-sized mammals that belong to the Megalonychidae family (two-toed sloth) and Bradypodidae (three-toed sloth), classified into sixspecies. They are part of the order Pilosa and are therefore related toanteaters, which sport a similar set of specialized claws. Extant sloths are arboreal(tree dwelling) , their habitat is located in the jungles of Central and South America, and are known for being slow-moving, and because of their slow movement they got name of “sloths”. Extinct sloth species include many ground sloths.

Sloths make a good habitat for other organisms, and a single sloth may be home to moths, beetles, cockroaches, ciliates, fungi, and algae.

The sloth’s taxonomic suborder is Folivora, while some call it Phyllophaga. Both names mean “leaf-eaters”; derived from Latin and Greek respectively. Names for the animals used by tribes in Ecuador include Ritto, Rit and Ridette, mostly forms of the word “sleep”, “eat” and “dirty” from Tagaeri tribe of Huaorani.

Sloths are classified as folivores as the bulk of their diet consists of buds, tender shoots, and leaves, mainly of Cecropiatrees. Some two-toed sloths have been documented as eating insects, small reptiles, and birds as a small supplement to their diet. Linnaeus’s two-toed sloth has recently been documented eating human faeces from open latrines. They have made extraordinary adaptations to an arboreal browsing lifestyle. Leaves, their main food source, provide very little energy or nutrition and do not digest easily. Sloths therefore have large, specialized, slow-acting stomachs with multiple compartments in which symbiotic bacteria break down the tough leaves. As much as two-thirds of a well-fed sloth’s body-weight consists of the contents of its stomach, and the digestive process can take a month or more to complete.

Disney Princess Turned Into Avengers

Disney Princess is a media franchise owned by The Walt Disney Company. Created by Disney Consumer Products chairman Andy Mooney in the late 90s, the franchise features a line-up of fictional female heroines who have appeared in many Disney animated feature films.

The ten current members of the franchise are Snow White, Cinderella, Aurora, Ariel, Belle, Jasmine, Pocahontas, Mulan, Tiana and Rapunzel. In June 2013, Merida from Brave will be joining the line-up. The franchise has released many dolls, sing-along videos and a variety of other girls’ products, apparel, home decor and a variety of toys featuring the Disney Princesses.

In early 1999, when Andy Mooney was hired by Disney’s Consumer Products division to help combat dropping sales, the idea for the Disney Princess franchise was born. Soon after joining Disney, Mooney attended his first Disney on Ice show. While waiting in line, he found himself surrounded by young girls dressed as princesses. “They weren’t even Disney products. They were generic princess products”, he mused. Soon after realizing the demand, the Disney Princess line was formed.

Despite limited advertising and no focus groups, the various Disney Princess items released became a huge success. Sales at Disney Consumer Products rose from $300 million in 2001 to $3 billion in 2006.

Most Famous Disney Princesses Turned Into Zombies

The figure of the zombie has appeared several times in fantasy themed fiction and entertainment, as early as the 1929 novel The Magic Island by William Seabrook. Time claimed that the book “introduced ‘zombi’ into U.S. speech”. In 1932, Victor Halperin directed White Zombie, a horror film starring Bela Lugosi. This film, capitalizing on the same voodoo zombie themes as Seabrook’s book of three years prior, is often regarded as the first legitimate zombie film ever made, and introduced the word “zombie” to the wider world. Other zombie-themed films include Val Lewton’s I Walked With a Zombie (1943) and Wes Craven’s The Serpent and the Rainbow, (1988) a heavily fictionalized account of Wade Davis’ book.

The zombie also appears as a metaphor in protest songs, symbolizing mindless adherence to authority, particularly in law enforcement and the armed forces. Well-known examples include Fela Kuti’s 1976 album Zombie, and The Cranberries’ 1994 single “Zombie”.

A new version of the zombie, distinct from that described in Haitian religion, has also emerged in popular culture in recent decades. This “zombie” is taken largely from George A. Romero’s seminal film The Night of the Living Dead, which was in turn partly inspired by Richard Matheson’s 1954 novel I Am Legend. The word zombie is not used in Night of the Living Dead, but was applied later by fans.

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