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June 18, 2019

Breathtaking Dress Made From Used Film Stock

Film stock is photographic film on which filmmaking of motion pictures are shot and reproduced. The equivalent in television production is video tape.

Early motion picture experiments were performed using paper roll film, which was difficult to view a single, continuously moving image without complex apparatus. The paper film was fragile. Transparent and flexible film base material, celluloid, was discovered and refined for photographic use by John Carbutt, Hannibal Goodwin, and George Eastman.

Eastman Kodak made celluloid film commercially available in 1889; Thomas Henry Blair, in 1891, was its first competitor. The stock had a frosted base to facilitate easier viewing by transmitted light. Emulsions were orthochromatic. By November 1891 William Dickson, at Edison’s laboratory, was using Blair’s stock for Kinetos cope experiments. Blair’s company supplied film to Edison for five years. Between 1892 and 1893, Eastman experienced problems with production. Because of patent lawsuits in 1893, Blair left his American company and established another in Britain. Eastman supplied Edison with film.

Blair’s new company supplied European filmmaking pioneers, including Birt Acres, Robert Paul, George Albert Smith, Charles Urban, and the Lumiere Brothers. By 1896 the new movie projector required a fully transparent film base that Blair’s American operation could not supply. Eastman shortly thereafter bought the company out and became the leading supplier of film stock. Louis Lumiere worked with Victor Planchon to adapt the Lumiere “Blue Label” (Etiquette Bleue) photographic plate emulsion for use on celluloid roll film, which began in early 1896.

Beautiful Dresses Made From Trash

Waste (also known as rubbish, trash, refuse, garbage, junk, and litter) is unwanted or useless materials.
Waste is directly linked to human development, both technological and social. The compositions of different wastes have varied over time and location, with industrial development and innovation being directly linked to waste materials. Examples of this include plastics and nuclear technology. Some waste components have economic value and can be recycled once correctly recovered. Waste is sometimes a subjective concept, because items that some people discard may have value to others. It is widely recognized that waste materials can be a valuable resource, whilst there is debate as to how this value is best realized. Such concepts are colloquially expressed in western culture by such idioms as “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.”

Litter refers to waste disposed of improperly.

There are many waste types defined by modern systems of waste management, notably including:

Municipal Waste includes Household waste, Commercial waste, and Demolition waste

Hazardous Waste includes Industrial waste

Bio-medical Waste includes Clinical waste

Special Hazardous waste includes Radioactive waste, explosives waste, and Electronic waste (e-waste)

There are many issues that surround reporting waste. It is most commonly measured by size or weight, and there is a stark difference between the two. For example, organic waste is much heavier when it is wet, and plastic or glass bottles can have different weights but be the same size. On a global scale it is difficult to report waste because countries have different definitions of waste and what falls into waste categories, as well as different ways of reporting.










Vintage Dresses Made From Cardboard

Cardboard is a generic term for a heavy-duty paper of various strengths, ranging from a simple arrangement of a single thick sheet of paper to complex configurations featuring multiple corrugated and uncorrugated layers.
Despite widespread use in general English, the term is deprecated in business and industry. Material producers, container manufacturers, packaging engineers, and standards organizations, try to use more specific terminology. There is still no complete and uniform usage. Often the term “cardboard” is avoided because it does not define any particular material.
The term has been used since at least as early as 1683 when, with a publication of that year stating that “The scabbards mentioned in printers’ grammars of the last century were of cardboard or millboard”. The Kellogg brothers first used paperboard cartons to hold their flaked corn cereal, and later, when they began marketing it to the general public, a heat-sealed bag of Wax paper was wrapped around the outside of the box and printed with their brand name. This marked the origin of the cereal box, though in modern times, the sealed bag is plastic and is kept inside the box rather than outside. Another early American packaging industry pioneer was the Kieckhefer Container Company, run by John W. Kieckhefer, which excelled in the use of fibre shipping containers, which especially included the paper milk carton.








Unique And Strange Dress With A Single Oversized Breast

The breast is the upper ventral region of the torso of a primate, in left and right sides, which in a female contains the mammary gland that secretes milk used to feed infants.
Both men and women develop breasts from the same embryological tissues. However, at puberty, female sex hormones, mainly estrogen, promote breast development, which does not occur in men, due to the higher amount of testosterone. As a result, women’s breasts become far more prominent than those of men.
The English word breast derives from the Old English word brēost (breast, bosom) from Proto-Germanic breustam (breast), from the Proto-Indo-European base bhreus– (to swell, to sprout). The breast spelling conforms to the Scottish and North English dialectal pronunciations.
The breast is an apocrine gland that produces milk to feed an infant child; for which the nipple of the breast is centred in (surrounded by) an areola (nipple-areola complex, NAC), the skin color of which varies from pink to dark brown, and has many sebaceous glands. The basic units of the breast are the terminal duct lobular units (TDLUs), which produce the fatty breast milk. They give the breast its offspring-feeding functions as a mammary gland.
They are distributed throughout the body of the breast; approximately two-thirds of the lactiferous tissue is within 30-mm of the base of the nipple. The terminal lactiferous ducts drain the milk from TDLUs into 4–18 lactiferous ducts, which drain to the nipple; the milk-glands-to-fat ratio is 2:1 in a lactating woman, and 1:1 in a non-lactating woman.


Fancy Angry Birds Dress

A dress (also known as a frock or a gown) is a garment consisting of a skirt with an attached bodice (or a matching bodice giving the effect of a one-piece garment). In Western culture, dresses are usually considered to be items of women’s and girls’ apparel. The hemline of dresses can be as high as the upper thigh or as low as the ground, depending on the whims of fashion and the modesty or personal taste of the wearer. Dresses increased dramatically to the hoopskirt and crinoline-supported styles of the 1860s; then fullness was draped and drawn to the back. Dresses had a “day” bodice with a high neckline and long sleeves, and an “evening” bodice with a low neckline (decollete) and very short sleeves. Throughout this period, the length of fashionable dresses varied only slightly, between ankle-length and floor-sweeping. In Europe and America, dresses are worn by females of all ages as an alternative to a separate skirt and blouse or trousers. Dresses are often used by young girls and as more formal attire by adult women. Potential drawbacks of dresses include being either too long or cumbersome for the performance of some physical activities such as climbing stairs or ladders. In addition, some dress styles, particularly those with back closures, can be difficult or even impossible to don or remove without assistance. Dresses however can be cooler and less confining than many trouser styles, and they are still very popular for special occasions such as proms or weddings.




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