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December 10, 2018

Making A Boat Of Plastic Bottles

A plastic bottle is a bottle made out of plastic. Plastic bottles are usually used to store liquids such as water, soft drinks, motor oil, cooking oil, medicine, shampoo, milk, and ink. The size ranges from very small sample bottles to large carboys.

Plastic bottles were first used commercially in 1947, but remained relatively expensive until the early 1960s when high-density polyethylene was introduced.

They quickly became popular with both manufacturers and customers due to their lightweight nature and relatively low production costs compared with glass bottles. Except for wine and beer, the food industry has almost completely replaced glass with plastic bottles.

There is an ongoing concern as to the use of some plastics in consumer food packaging solutions. The environmental impact of the disposal of these products, as well as concerns regarding consumer safety, are still debated.

Plastic water bottles are regulated by the FDA. The FDA periodically samples bottled water and also inspects bottled water plants. Plastic water bottle plants hold a low priority for inspection due to a continuously good safety record.  

Polluted River That Turned Red

Pollution is the introduction of contaminants into a natural environment that causes instability, disorder, harm or discomfort to the ecosystem i.e. physical systems or living organisms. Pollution can take the form of chemical substances or energy, such as noise, heat or light. Pollutants, the elements of pollution, can be either foreign substances/energies or naturally occurring contaminants. Pollution is often classed as point source or nonpoint source pollution. The Blacksmith Institute issues an annual list of the world’s worst polluted places. In the 2007 issues the ten top nominees are located in Azerbaijan, China, India, Peru, Russia, Ukraine and Zambia.
Air pollution has always accompanied civilizations. According to a 1983 article in the journal Science, “soot found on ceilings of prehistoric caves provides ample evidence of the high levels of pollution that was associated with inadequate ventilation of open fires.” The forging of metals appears to be a key turning point in the creation of significant air pollution levels outside the home. Core samples of glaciers in Greenland indicate increases in pollution associated with Greek, Roman and Chinese metal production.
King Edward I of England banned the burning of sea-coal by proclamation in London in 1272, after its smoke had become a problem. But the fuel was so common in England that this earliest of names for it was acquired because it could be carted away from some shores by the wheelbarrow.



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