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September 15, 2019

Breathtaking Dress Made From Used Film Stock

Film stock is photographic film on which filmmaking of motion pictures are shot and reproduced. The equivalent in television production is video tape.

Early motion picture experiments were performed using paper roll film, which was difficult to view a single, continuously moving image without complex apparatus. The paper film was fragile. Transparent and flexible film base material, celluloid, was discovered and refined for photographic use by John Carbutt, Hannibal Goodwin, and George Eastman.

Eastman Kodak made celluloid film commercially available in 1889; Thomas Henry Blair, in 1891, was its first competitor. The stock had a frosted base to facilitate easier viewing by transmitted light. Emulsions were orthochromatic. By November 1891 William Dickson, at Edison’s laboratory, was using Blair’s stock for Kinetos cope experiments. Blair’s company supplied film to Edison for five years. Between 1892 and 1893, Eastman experienced problems with production. Because of patent lawsuits in 1893, Blair left his American company and established another in Britain. Eastman supplied Edison with film.

Blair’s new company supplied European filmmaking pioneers, including Birt Acres, Robert Paul, George Albert Smith, Charles Urban, and the Lumiere Brothers. By 1896 the new movie projector required a fully transparent film base that Blair’s American operation could not supply. Eastman shortly thereafter bought the company out and became the leading supplier of film stock. Louis Lumiere worked with Victor Planchon to adapt the Lumiere “Blue Label” (Etiquette Bleue) photographic plate emulsion for use on celluloid roll film, which began in early 1896.

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