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September 16, 2019

Classical Masterpieces Recreated In Real Life

The word classical has a few meanings. Usually, these meanings refer to past time, works of that era or later works influenced by that time. Classical things are often seen as ordered and part of high culture or a golden age, and contrasted to earlier or later things which may be seen as chaotic, elaborate or emotional. The word classical comes from the Latin word classicus, which is similar in meaning to the English phrase first class. The word seldom has this precise meaning in modern English, as illustrated by the examples below.

The word classical can also be used to refer to other cultures, by analogy with classical antiquity and classical music. Examples of this usage include:

Classical language, a dead or archaic language comparable to classical Latin. This normally means it has a literature that is considered classical, it is associated with a golden age, it was spoken by high-status people or it is considered to be ordered. Examples illustrating this are given below:

Classical Arabic is the Arabic language in which the Qur’an is written

Classical Nahuatl is the language spoken by Aztec nobles in the Valley of Mexico at the time of the 16th-century Spanish conquest

Classical French is the French language as systematised in the 17th and 18th centuries

Four Great Classical Novels, considered to be the greatest and most influential in Chinese fiction

The list of classical music styles gives many styles of music considered classical.

Old Masterpieces With Modern Fictional Characters

Masterpiece (or chef d’œuvre) in modern usage refers to a creation that has been given much critical praise, especially one that is considered the greatest work of a person’s career or to a work of outstanding creativity, skill, or workmanship.

Originally, the term masterpiece referred to a piece of work produced by an apprentice or journeyman aspiring to become a master craftsman in the old European guild system. His fitness to qualify for guild membership was judged partially by the masterpiece, and if he was successful, it was retained by the guild. Great care was therefore taken to produce a fine piece in whatever the craft was, whether confectionery, painting, gold smithing, knife making, or many other trades. The Royal Academy in London is one institution that has acquired a fine collection of “diploma works” as a condition of acceptance.

Originally the paper which a student needs to present in order to gain the degree of Master of Arts was also such a “masterpiece” – i.e. a fine piece of scholarship, the particular craft in which the student sought to be admitted as a master craftsman.

The term probably derives from the Dutch “meesterstuk” (German: Meisterstück), and the form “masterstik” is recorded in English in 1579 (or in Scots, since this was from some Aberdeen guild regulations), whereas “masterpiece” is first found in 1605, already outside a guild context, in a Ben Jonson play.

In modern times it is used for an exceptionally good piece of creative work or the best piece of work of a particular artist or craftsman.

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