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September 16, 2019

Girl With Huge Nails

A nail is a horn-like envelope covering the dorsal aspect of the terminal phalanges of fingers and toes in humans, most non-human primates, and a few other mammals. Nails are similar to claws in other animals. Fingernails and toenails are made of a tough protein called keratin, as are animals’ hooves and horns. The mammalian nail, claw, and hoof are all examples of unguis.

The nail consists of the nail plate, the nail matrix and the nail bed below it, and the grooves surrounding it.

The matrix is sometimes called  the matrix unguis, keratogenous membrane, nail matrix, or onychostroma. It is the tissue (or germinal matrix) which the nail protects. It is the part of the nail bed that is beneath the nail and contains nerves, lymph and blood vessels. The matrix is responsible for producing cells that become the nail plate.

The width and thickness of the nail plate is determined by the size, length, and thickness of the matrix, while the shape of the fingertip itself shows if the nail plate is flat, arched or hooked. The matrix will continue to grow as long as it receives nutrition and remains in a healthy condition. As new nail plate cells are made, they push older nail plate cells forward; and in this way older cells become compressed, flat, and translucent. This makes the capillaries in the nail bed below visible, resulting in a pink color.

Old Chinese Masterpieces Recreated With Nails

Masterpiece (or chef d’œuvre) in modern usage refers to a creation that has been given much critical praise, especially one that is considered the greatest work of a person’s career or to a work of outstanding creativity, skill or workmanship.

Originally, the term masterpiece referred to a piece of work produced by an apprentice or journeyman aspiring to become a master craftsman in the old European guild system.

His fitness to qualify for guild membership was judged partially by the Masterpiece, and if he was successful, it was retained by the guild. Great care was therefore taken to produce a fine piece in whatever the craft was, whether confectionery, painting, gold smithing, knife making, or many other trades.

The Royal Academy in London is one institution that has acquired a fine collection of “Diploma works” as a condition of acceptance.

Originally the paper which a student needs to present in order to gain the degree of Master of Arts was also such a “Masterpiece” – i.e. a fine piece of scholarship, the particular craft in which the student sought to be admitted as a master craftsman.

The term probably derives from the Dutch “meesterstuk” (German: Meisterstück), and the form “masterstik” is recorded in English in 1579 (or in Scots, since this was from some Aberdeen guild regulations), whereas “masterpiece” is first found in 1605, already outside a guild context, in a Ben Jonson play.

In modern times it is used for an exceptionally good piece of creative work or the best piece of work of a particular artist or craftsman.

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