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May 20, 2019

Sand Art That Is Older Then A Century

Sand painting is a form of art that consists of pouring colored sands, powdered pigments from minerals or crystals, and pigments from other natural or synthetic sources onto a surface to make a fixed or unfixed sand painting.

Unfixed sand paintings have a long established cultural history in many social groupings around the entire globe, and are often temporary, ritual paintings prepared for religious or healing ceremonies. It is also referred to as dry painting.

Dry painting is practiced by Native Americans in the Southwestern United States, by Tibetan and Buddhist monks, as well as Australian Aborigines, and also by Latin Americans on certain Christian holy days.

In the sand painting of southwestern Native Americans, the Medicine Man (or Hatałii) paints loosely upon the ground of a hogan, where the ceremony takes place, or on a buckskin or cloth tarpaulin, by letting the colored sands flow through his fingers with control and skill. There are 600 to 1000 different traditional designs for sand paintings which are known to the Navajo. They do not view the paintings as static objects, but as spiritual, living beings to be treated with great respect. More than 30 different sand paintings may be associated with one ceremony.

The colors for the painting are usually accomplished with naturally colored sand, crushed gypsum (white), yellow ochre, red sandstone, charcoal, and a mixture of charcoal and gypsum (blue). Brown can be made by mixing red and black; red and white make pink. Other coloring agents include corn meal, flower pollen, or powdered roots and bark.

The paintings are for healing purposes only. Many of them contain images of Yeibicheii (the Holy People). While creating the painting, the medicine man will chant, asking the yeibicheii to come into the painting and help heal the patient.

14 Years Old “Treasure” Under Your Car Seat

A car seat is the seat used in automobiles, hence the name. Most car seats are made from inexpensive but durable material in order to withstand as much use as possible.

The most common material is polyester. The lumbar is the region of the spine between the diaphragm and the pelvis; it supports the most weight and is the most flexible.

The adjustable lumbar mechanisms in seats allow the user to change the seat back shape in this region, to make it more comfortable. Some seats are long enough to support full thigh. A child restraint system, also commonly referred to as a child safety seat or a car seat, is a restraint which is secured to the seat of an automobile equipped with safety harnesses or seat belts, to hold a child in the event of a crash.

This kind of seat incorporates specially shaped panels in the forward edge of the seat cushion, reducing the tendency for the occupant to slide beneath the seatbelt in a severe frontal collision. Anti-submarine seating is a safety feature which may be more important for the front seats than the rear seats.

A bucket seat is a seat with a contoured platform to accommodate one person, distinct from a bench seat which is a flat platform designed to seat up to three people. Bucket seats are standard in fast cars to keep riders in place when making sharp or quick turns.

The Difference Between 1977 Hobbit And 2013 Hobbit

Hobbits are a fictional humanoid race, and they are easily recognizable by their height, all of the hobbits are shorter than humans, and by their large feet.

Hobbits first appeared in the novel The Hobbit, in which the main protagonist, Bilbo Baggins, is the titular hobbit. The novel, The Lord of the Rings, includes more Hobbits as major characters, Frodo Baggins, Samwise Gamgee, Peregrin Took and Meriadoc Brandybuck, as well as several other minor hobbit characters. Hobbits are also briefly mentioned in The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales.

According to the author in the prologue to The Lord of the Rings, Hobbits are “relatives” of the race of Men. Elsewhere Tolkien describes Hobbits as a “variety” or separate “branch” of humans. Within the story, Hobbits and other races seem aware of the similarities.

However, within the story, Hobbits considered themselves a separate people. At the time of the events in The Lord of the Rings, Hobbits lived in the Shire and in Bree in the north west of Middle-earth, though by the end, some had moved out to the Tower Hills and to Gondor and Rohan.

Awesome Combination Of Brass Knuckle And A Gun

Brass knuckles, which can be also called knuckles, knucks, brass knucks, knucklebusters, or knuckledusters, are weapons used in hand-to-hand combat. Brass knuckles are pieces of metal shaped to fit around the knuckles.

Despite their name, they are rarely made out of brass; however, the most common material for this weapon is steel. Designed to preserve and concentrate a punch’s force by directing it toward a harder and smaller contact area, they result in increased tissue disruption, including an increased likelihood of fracturing the victim’s bones on impact.

The extended and rounded palm grip also spreads across the attacker’s palm the counter-force that would otherwise be absorbed primarily by the attacker’s fingers, reducing the likelihood of damage to the attacker’s fingers.

Metal ring and knuckle style weapons date back to ancient times and have been used all over the world for many hundreds of years. The Nihang Singhs used an early variant called Sher Panja in the 18th century.

Cast iron, brass, lead, and wood knuckles were made in the United States during the American Civil War (1861–1865). Soldiers would often buy cast iron or brass knuckles. If they could not buy them, they would carve their own from wood, or cast them at camp by melting lead bullets and using a mold in the dirt.

Some brass knuckles have rounded rings, which increase the impact of blows. Other instruments (not generally considered to be “brass knuckles” or “metal knuckles” per se) may have spikes, sharp points and cutting edges.

These devices come in many variations and are called by a variety of names, including “knuckle knives.”

A Field Kit That Was Used By Surgeons In The 19th Century

In medicine, a surgeon is a doctor who is a specialist in surgery. Surgery is a broad category of invasive medical treatment that involves the cutting of a body, whether that of a human or other animal, for a specific reason such as the removal of diseased tissue or to repair a tear or breakage. Surgeons may be physicians, dentists, podiatrists or veterinarians.

In the U.S., surgeons train for longer than other specialists; only after 9 years of training do they qualify. These years include 4 years of medical school and a minimum of 5 years of residency.

In early recorded history, surgery was mostly associated with barber surgeons who were both haircutting who also used their cutting tools to undertake surgical procedures, often at the battlefield and also for their royal paymasters. With the advances in medicine and physiology, the professions of barbers and surgeons diverged from each other and by the 19th century barber surgeons had disappeared.

Military surgeons continued, although the title Surgeon General also came to refer to government public health officers. In 1950, the Royal College of Surgeons of England in London began to offer surgeons a formal status via RCS membership. The title Mister became a badge of honor, and today after someone graduates from medical school with the degrees MBBS or MB ChB.

Here Are Some Very Strange Old Russian Marketing Posters

A poster is piece of printed paper designed so it can be attached to a wall or vertical surface. Typically posters include both textual and graphic elements, although a poster may be either wholly graphical or wholly text. Posters are designed to be both eye-catching and informative. Posters may be used for many purposes.

They are a frequent tool of advertisers (particularly of events, musicians and films), propagandists, protestors and other groups trying to communicate a message. Posters are also used for reproductions of artwork, particularly famous works, and are generally low-cost compared to original artwork.

According to the French historian Max Gallo, “for over two hundred years, posters have been displayed in public places all over the world. Visually striking, they have been designed to attract the attention of passers-by, making us aware of a political viewpoint, enticing us to attend specific events, or encouraging us to purchase a particular product or service.”

The modern poster, as we know it, however, dates back to the middle of 19th century when the printing industry perfected color lithography and made mass production possible.

“In little more than a hundred years”, writes poster expert John Barnicoat, “it has come to be recognized as a vital art form, attracting artists at every level, from painters like Toulouse-Lautrec and Mucha to theatrical and commercial designers.”

They have ranged in styles from Art Nouveau, Symbolism, Cubism, and Art Deco to the more formal Bauhaus and the often incoherent hippie posters of the 1960s.

Xenomorph On An Old Abbey In Scotland

An abbey (comes from Latin word abbatia, derived from Latin language abbatia, from Latin abbās, derived from Aramaic language abba,”father”) is a Catholic monastery or convent, under the authority of an Abbot or an Abbess, who serves as the spiritual father or mother of the community.

The term can also refer to an establishment which has ceased to function as an abbey for long periods of time, in some cases for centuries. There were many orders that had their own styles of abbeys. Among these were the primary orders such as Benedictine, Cistercian, Carthusian. However there were also the minor order such as the Dominicans, Franciscans, and Carmelites.

The earliest known Christian monastic communities consisted of groups of cells or huts collected about a common center, which was usually the house of some hermit or anchorite famous for holiness or singular asceticism, but without any attempt at orderly arrangement. This arrangement probably followed the example set in part by the Essenes in Judea.

In the earliest age of Christian monasticism the ascetics were accustomed to live singly, independent of one another, not far from some village church, supporting themselves by the labour of their own hands, and distributing the surplus after the supply of their own scanty wants to the poor. Increasing religious fervour, aided by persecution, drove them farther and farther away from the civilization into mountain solitudes or lonely deserts.

Classical Masterpieces Recreated In Real Life

The word classical has a few meanings. Usually, these meanings refer to past time, works of that era or later works influenced by that time. Classical things are often seen as ordered and part of high culture or a golden age, and contrasted to earlier or later things which may be seen as chaotic, elaborate or emotional. The word classical comes from the Latin word classicus, which is similar in meaning to the English phrase first class. The word seldom has this precise meaning in modern English, as illustrated by the examples below.

The word classical can also be used to refer to other cultures, by analogy with classical antiquity and classical music. Examples of this usage include:

Classical language, a dead or archaic language comparable to classical Latin. This normally means it has a literature that is considered classical, it is associated with a golden age, it was spoken by high-status people or it is considered to be ordered. Examples illustrating this are given below:

Classical Arabic is the Arabic language in which the Qur’an is written

Classical Nahuatl is the language spoken by Aztec nobles in the Valley of Mexico at the time of the 16th-century Spanish conquest

Classical French is the French language as systematised in the 17th and 18th centuries

Four Great Classical Novels, considered to be the greatest and most influential in Chinese fiction

The list of classical music styles gives many styles of music considered classical.

Rusty Old Mountain Dew Can

Mountain Dew is a carbonated soft drink brand produced and owned by PepsiCo. The original formula was invented in during 1940’s by Tennessee beverage bottlers Barney and Ally Hartman and was first marketed in Marion, Virginia; Knoxville, Tennessee and Johnson City, Tennessee with the slogan “Ya-Hoo! Mountain Dew. It’ll tickle your innards.” A revised formula was created by Bill Bridgforth in 1958. The Mountain Dew brand and production rights were acquired by the Pepsi-Cola company in 1964, at which point distribution expanded more widely across the United States and Canada.

Between the 1940s and 1980s, there was just one type of Mountain Dew, which was citrus-flavored and caffeinated. Diet Mountain Dew was introduced in 1988, followed by Mountain Dew Red, which was introduced and subsequently discontinued in 1988. While Mountain Dew Red was short-lived, it represented the beginning of a long-term trend of Mountain Dew being produced in different flavor variations. In 2001, a cherry flavor called Code Red debuted. This product line extension trend has continued, with expansion into specialty, limited time production, region-specific, and retailer-specific (Taco Bell, 7-Eleven) variations of Mountain Dew.

Production was first extended to the UK in 1996, though this initial debut was short-lived as it was phased out in 1998. A similar but very different-tasting product returned to the UK under the name “Mountain Dew Energy” in 2010 and returned to Ireland in Spring 2011. As of 2009, Mountain Dew represented a 6.7 percent share of the overall carbonated soft drinks market in the U.S. Its competition includes Mello Yello, and Sun Drop; Mountain Dew accounts for eighty percent of citrus soft drinks sold within the U.S.

Old Chinese Masterpieces Recreated With Nails

Masterpiece (or chef d’œuvre) in modern usage refers to a creation that has been given much critical praise, especially one that is considered the greatest work of a person’s career or to a work of outstanding creativity, skill or workmanship.

Originally, the term masterpiece referred to a piece of work produced by an apprentice or journeyman aspiring to become a master craftsman in the old European guild system.

His fitness to qualify for guild membership was judged partially by the Masterpiece, and if he was successful, it was retained by the guild. Great care was therefore taken to produce a fine piece in whatever the craft was, whether confectionery, painting, gold smithing, knife making, or many other trades.

The Royal Academy in London is one institution that has acquired a fine collection of “Diploma works” as a condition of acceptance.

Originally the paper which a student needs to present in order to gain the degree of Master of Arts was also such a “Masterpiece” – i.e. a fine piece of scholarship, the particular craft in which the student sought to be admitted as a master craftsman.

The term probably derives from the Dutch “meesterstuk” (German: Meisterstück), and the form “masterstik” is recorded in English in 1579 (or in Scots, since this was from some Aberdeen guild regulations), whereas “masterpiece” is first found in 1605, already outside a guild context, in a Ben Jonson play.

In modern times it is used for an exceptionally good piece of creative work or the best piece of work of a particular artist or craftsman.

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