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August 19, 2019

Most Famous Paintings Recreated With LEGO Blocks

Lego’s are probably the most famous toys manufactured by The Lego Group, a privately held company based in Billund, Denmark. The company’s flagship product, Lego, consists of colorful interlocking plastic bricks and an accompanying array of gears, mini figures and many other parts. Lego bricks can be assembled and connected in many ways, to construct such objects as vehicles, buildings, and even working robots. Anything constructed can then be taken apart again, and the pieces used to make other objects.

Lego began manufacturing interlocking toy bricks in 1949. Since then a global Lego subculture has developed, supporting movies, games, competitions, and six themed amusement parks. As of 2013, around 560 billion Lego parts had been produced.

The Lego Group began in the workshop of Ole Kirk Christiansen, a carpenter from Billund, Denmark, who began making wooden toys in 1932. In 1934, his company came to be called “Lego”, from the Danish phrase leg godt, which means “play well”. It expanded to producing plastic toys in 1947. In 1949 Lego began producing, among other new products, an early version of the now famous interlocking bricks, calling them “Automatic Binding Bricks”.

These bricks were based in part on the KiddicraftSelf-Locking Bricks, which were patented in the United Kingdom in 1939 and then there released in 1947. Lego modified the design of the Kiddicraft brick after examining a sample given to it by the British supplier of aninjection-molding machine that the company had purchased.

Old Masterpieces With Modern Fictional Characters

Masterpiece (or chef d’œuvre) in modern usage refers to a creation that has been given much critical praise, especially one that is considered the greatest work of a person’s career or to a work of outstanding creativity, skill, or workmanship.

Originally, the term masterpiece referred to a piece of work produced by an apprentice or journeyman aspiring to become a master craftsman in the old European guild system. His fitness to qualify for guild membership was judged partially by the masterpiece, and if he was successful, it was retained by the guild. Great care was therefore taken to produce a fine piece in whatever the craft was, whether confectionery, painting, gold smithing, knife making, or many other trades. The Royal Academy in London is one institution that has acquired a fine collection of “diploma works” as a condition of acceptance.

Originally the paper which a student needs to present in order to gain the degree of Master of Arts was also such a “masterpiece” – i.e. a fine piece of scholarship, the particular craft in which the student sought to be admitted as a master craftsman.

The term probably derives from the Dutch “meesterstuk” (German: Meisterstück), and the form “masterstik” is recorded in English in 1579 (or in Scots, since this was from some Aberdeen guild regulations), whereas “masterpiece” is first found in 1605, already outside a guild context, in a Ben Jonson play.

In modern times it is used for an exceptionally good piece of creative work or the best piece of work of a particular artist or craftsman.

The Most Famous Painting Recreated From Jelly Beans

Jelly beans are a small bean-shaped type of confectionery with a hard candy shell and a gummy interior which come in a wide variety of flavors. The confection is primarily made of sugar.

The Turkish Delight, a Middle Eastern candy made of soft jelly, covered in confectioner’s powder, was an early precursor to the jelly bean that inspired its gummy interior. However, it is generally thought that jelly beans first surfaced in 1861 when Boston confectioner William Schrafft urged people to send his jelly beans to soldiers during the American Civil War.

It wasn’t until July 5, 1905 that the mentioning of jelly beans was published in the Chicago Daily News. The advertisement publicized bulk jelly beans sold by volume for nine cents per pound, according to the book, “The Century in Food: America’s Fads and Favorites.”

Today, most historians contend that in the United States, they were first linked with Easter in the 1930s.

The basic ingredients of jelly beans include sugars, corn syrup, and starch. Relatively minor amounts of the emulsifying agent lecithin, anti-foaming agents, an edible wax such as beeswax, salt, and confectioner’s glazeare also included. The ingredients that give each bean its character are also relatively small in proportion and may vary depending on the flavor. Most jelly beans are sold as an assortment of around eight different flavors, most of them fruit based. Assortments of “spiced” jellybeans and gumdrops are also available, which include a similar number of spice and mint flavors. The colors of jelly beans often correspond with a fruit and a “spiced” flavor.

Classic Paintings Recreated By Modern Artists

An artist is a person engaged in one or more of any of a broad spectrum of activities related to creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. The common usage in both everyday speech and academic discourse is a practitioner in the visual arts only. The term is often used in the entertainment business, especially in a business context, for musicians and other performers (less often for actors). “Artiste” (the French for artist) is a variant used in English only in this context. Use of the term to describe writers, for example, is certainly valid, but less common, and mostly restricted to contexts like criticism.
Although the Greek word “techně” is often mistranslated as “art,” it actually implies mastery of any sort of craft. The Latin-derived form of the word is “tecnicus”, from which the English words technique, technology, technical are derived.
In Greek culture each of the nine Muses oversaw a different field of human creation:
Calliope (the ‘beautiful of speech’): chief of the muses and muse of epic or heroic poetry
Clio (the ‘glorious one’): muse of history
Erato (the ‘amorous one’): muse of love or erotic poetry, lyrics, and marriage songs
Euterpe (the ‘well-pleasing’): muse of music and lyric poetry
Melpomene (the ‘chanting one’): muse of tragedy
Polyhymnia or Polymnia (the ‘[singer] of many hymns’): muse of sacred song, oratory, lyric, singing and rhetoric
Terpsichore (the ‘[one who] delights in dance’): muse of choral song and dance
Thalia (the ‘blossoming one’): muse of comedy and bucolic poetry
Urania (the ‘celestial one’): muse of astronomy













Bottle With A Painting Of Lando Calrissian

A bottle is a rigid container with a neck that is narrower than the body and a “mouth”. By contrast, a jar has a relatively large mouth or opening. Bottles are often made ofglass, clay, plastic, aluminum or other impervious materials, and typically used to storeliquids such as water, milk, soft drinks, beer, wine, cooking oil, medicine, shampoo, ink, and chemicals. A device applied in the bottling line to seal the mouth of a bottle is termed an external bottle cap, closure, or internal stopper. A bottle can also be sealed by a conductive “innerseal” by using induction sealing.
The bottle has developed over millennia of use, with some of the earliest examples appearing in China, Phoenicia, Rome and Crete. The Chinese used bottles to store liquids. Bottles are often recycled according to the SPI recycling code for the material. Some regions have a legally mandated deposit which is refunded after returning the bottle to the retailer.
First attested in English 14th century, the word bottle derives from old French boteille, which comes from vulgar Latin butticula, itself from late Latin buttis meaning “cask”, which is perhaps the latinisation of the Greek βοῦττις (bouttis), “vessel”.
Since prehistoric times, bottle containers were created from clay or as phaltum sealed woven containers. Early glass bottles were produced by the Phoenicians; specimens of Phoenician translucent and transparent glass bottles have been found in Cyprus and Rhodes generally varying in length from three to six inches. These Phoenician examples from the first millennium BC were thought to have been used for perfume.





Badass Western Paintings

The Western is a genre of various visual arts, such as film, television, radio, literature, painting and others. Westerns are devoted to telling stories set primarily in the latter half of the 19th century in the American Old West, hence the name. Some Westerns are set as early as the Battle of the Alamo in 1836. There are also a number of films about Western-type characters in contemporary settings, such as Junior Bonner set in the 1970s and The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada in the 21st century.

Westerns often portray how desolate and hard life was for American frontier families. These families are faced with change that would severely alter their way of life. This may be depicted by showing conflict between natives and settlers or U.S. Cavalry or between cattle ranchers and farmers (“sodbusters”), or by showing ranchers being threatened by the onset of the Industrial Revolution. Despite being tightly associated with a specific time and place in American history, these themes have allowed Westerns to be produced and enjoyed across the world.

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