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August 19, 2019

Road With A Carpet Of Red Peppers

The cayenne pepper—also known as the Guinea spice, cow-horn pepper, aleva, bird pepper, or, especially in its powdered form, red pepper—is a hotchili pepper used to flavor dishes. It remains green on the plant even when mature, once picked may or may not turn red which is when it is normally eaten, but also eaten while still green. It is a cultivar of Capsicum annuum related to bell peppers,jalapeños, paprika and others. The Capsicum genus is in the nightshade family (Solanaceae).

It is named for the city of Cayenne in French Guiana.

The fruits are generally dried and ground, or pulped and baked into cakes, which are then ground and sifted to make the powdered spice of the same name.

Cayenne is used in cooking spicy dishes, as a powder or in its whole form, or in a thin, vinegar-based sauce. It is generally rated at 30,000 to 50,000 Scoville units. It is also used as an herbal supplement, and was mentioned by Nicholas Culpeper in his Complete Herbal, 1653, as “guinea pepper” a misnomer for “guiana pepper”.

Most cultivated varieties of cayenne, Capsicum annuum, can be grown in a variety of locations and need approximately 100 days to mature. Peppers prefer warm, moist, nutrient-rich soil in a warm climate. The plants grow to about 0.6–1 m in height and should be spaced 1 m apart.

A Special Bridge For Boats

A bridge is a building that has a use to span physical obstacles such as a body of water, valley, or road, for the purpose of providing passage over the obstacle. There are many different kinds that all serve unique purposes and apply to different situations. Designs of bridges vary depending on the function of the bridge, the nature of the terrain where the bridge is constructed and anchored, the material used to make it, and the funds available to build it.

The Oxford English Dictionary traces the origin of the word bridge to an Old English word brycg, of the same meaning, derived from the hypothetical Proto-Germanic rootbrugjō. There are cognates in other Germanic languages.

The first bridges were made by nature itself — as simple as a log fallen across a stream or stones in the river. The first bridges made by humans were probably spans of cut wooden logs or planks and eventually stones, using a simple support and crossbeam arrangement.

Some early Americans used trees or bamboo poles to cross small caverns or wells to get from one place to another. A common form of lashing sticks, logs, and deciduous branches together involved the use of long reeds or other harvested fibers woven together to form a connective rope capable of binding and holding together the materials used in early bridges.

Funny Traffic Signs That Include Animals

Traffic signs or road signs are signs erected at the side of roads to provide information to road users. With traffic volumes increasing over the last eight decades, many countries have adopted pictorial signs or otherwise simplified and standardized their signs to facilitate international travel where language differences would create barriers, and in general to help enhance traffic safety. Such pictorial signs use symbols (often silhouettes) in place of words and are usually based on international protocols. Such signs were first developed in Europe, and have been adopted by most countries to varying degrees. Traffic signs can be grouped into several types. For example, Annexe 1 of the Vienna Convention on Road Signs and Signals (1968), which at 30 June 2004 had 52 signatory countries, defines eight categories of signs:
A. Danger warning signs
B. Priority signs
C. Prohibitory or restrictive signs
D. Mandatory signs
E. Special regulation signs
F. Information, facilities, or service signs
G. Direction, position, or indication signs
H. Additional panels
In the United States, Canada and Australia signs are categorised as follows:
Regulatory signs
Warning signs
Guide signs
Street signs
Route marker signs
Expressway signs
Freeway signs
Welcome Signs
Informational signs
Recreation and cultural interest signs
Emergency management (civil defense) signs
Temporary traffic control (construction or work zone) signs
School signs
Railroad and light rail signs
Bicycle signs






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