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November 25, 2017

TMNT Pizza Bong

A bong (also water pipe, billy, bubbler, bing, or moof) is a filtration device/apparatus generally used for smoking cannabis, tobacco, or other herbal substances.

In construction and function a bong is similar to a hookah, except smaller and especially more portable. A bong may be constructed from any air- and water-tight vessel by adding a bowl and stem apparatus (or slide) which guides air downward to below water level whence it bubbles upward (“bubbler”) during use. To get fresh air into the bong and harvest the last remaining smoke, a hole known as the “carburator”, “carb”, “choke”, “bink”, “rush” “shotty” “kick hole” or simply “hole”, somewhere on the lower part of the bong above water level, is first kept covered during the smoking process, then opened to allow the smoke to be drawn into the respiratory system.

The word bong is an adaptation of the Thai word baung , which refers to a cylindrical wooden tube, pipe, or container cut from bamboo, and which also refers to the bong used for smoking.

Bongs have been in use by the Hmong, in Laos and Thailand, and all over Africa for centuries. One of the earliest recorded uses of the word in the West is in the McFarland Thai-English Dictionary, published in 1944, which describes one of the meanings of bong in the Thai language as, “a bamboo waterpipe for smoking kancha, tree, hashish, or the hemp-plant.” A January 1971 issue of the Marijuana Review also used the term.

Pumpkin Turned Into Krang From TMNT

Krang is a fictional supervillain who appears in the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles TV shows and most frequently in the 1987 STH cartoon and its associated media, such as the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures comic book and most of the classic TMNT video games.

Krang’s first comics appearance was in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures vol. 1, #1, published by Archie Comics in August 1988. In the TV series, Krang was voiced by Pat Fraley. He is still one of the main antagonists to the Ninja Turtles, appearing as General Krang in the 2012 IDW comic publication and as the leader of the Kraangs in the 2012 3D CGI Nickelodeon cartoon show.

Prior to the start of the 1987 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon, Krang was in command of an army of Rock Soldiers under the leadership of General Traag. He took the completed Technodrome (a powerful mobile battle fortress) for himself, then banished Von Drakus (who helped Krang build it) to Earth. When he was banished from Dimension X, Krang was stripped of his body and reduced to a brain-like form.

While on Earth, Krang allied himself with the Shredder, who, along with his robotic Foot Soldier army, moved into the Technodrome. In exchange, the Shredder had to design and build a new body for Krang, a human-shaped exo-suit. Shredder lived up to his part of the bargain in the season 1 episode “Shredder was Splintered”, in no small part because he was unable to deal with the Turtles and needed Krang’s help. In the season 3 episode “Shredderville”, the Turtles have a dream of a parallel world in which they never lived, and Shredder had no problem taking over the world;

Pictures Of The Strangest TMNT Comic

The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (or simply Ninja Turtles) are a fictional team of four teenage anthropomorphic turtles, who were trained by their anthropomorphic rat sensei in the art of ninjutsu and named after four Renaissance artists. From their home in the storm sewers of New York City, they battle petty criminals, evil megalomaniacs, and alien invaders, all while remaining isolated from society at large. The characters initially appeared in comic books before being licensed for toys, cartoons, video games, films, and other merchandise. During the peak of its popularity in the late 1980s through early 1990s, the franchise gained considerable worldwide success and fame. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Was created in an American comic book published by Mirage Studios in 1984 in Dover, New Hampshire. The concept arose from a humorous drawing sketched out by Kevin Eastman during a casual evening of brainstorming with his friend Peter Laird. Using money from a tax refund together with a loan from Eastman’s uncle, the young artists self-published a single issue comic intended to parody four of the most popular comics of the early 1980s: Marvel Comics’ Daredevil and New Mutants, Dave Sim’s Cerebus, and Frank Miller’s Ronin. Much of the Turtles’ mainstream success began when a licensing agent, Mark Freedman, sought out Eastman and Laird to propose wider merchandising opportunities for the offbeat property. In 1986, Dark Horse Miniatures produced a set of mmlead figurines. In January 1987, they visited the offices of Playmates Toys Inc, a small California toy company who wished to expand into the action figure market.






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